Transition Communities

An Academic Gateway to College Success 

Transition Communities are one or three-credit first-year seminars that help students excel in their first year at UNM through fostering skills for academic success and helping students discover and connect to the university. Students who participate in the Transition Community Program can expect to sharpen college success skills, explore their majors, and develop their degree plans. Courses are offered for students in a variety of majors, affiliations, and interest areas.

 

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Courses for Fall 2022

Succeeding on the UNM College CAMPus is a course designed to assist students participating in the College Assistance Migrant Program (CAMP) in their transition into college. The objectives in this course are:

Knowledge

• To connect students with resources including libraries, tutoring centers, and recreation.

• To foster academic success with strategies essential for the workload of higher learning.

Skills

• To develop or strengthen critical thinking skills.

• To improve students’ public speaking and collaboration skills.

Attitudes and Values

• To encourage student reflection on their own personal backgrounds and life experiences.

• To foster understanding of how backgrounds and experiences positively impact success.

• To cultivate and enhance responsible citizenship beyond campus.

Course: FYEX 1110
Meets: TR12:30 PM - 1:45 PM
Dane Smith Hall 226
CRN: 63671
Instructors: Ivan Olay

This Community is Full

This introductory course in architecture provides a roadmap to succeed in school, navigate the licensing process, and offers a wide understanding of this wonderful profession.
Course: FYEX 1110
Meets: MW11:00 AM - 12:15 PM

CRN: 63704
Instructors: Kristina Yu

This Community is Full

This course covers topics such as budgeting, loans, credit, investing, interest, banking, and taxes.

Wednesdays @ 1200pm-1250pm CRN: 73785

Course: FYEX 1110FYEX 1010
Meets: W12:00 PM - 12:50 PM

TR12:30 PM - 1:45 PM

CRN: 7378565433
Instructors: Brian VineyardJacob Greenberg

This Community is Full

This course covers topics such as budgeting, loans, credit, investing, interest, banking, and taxes.

Mondays @ 1200pm-1250pm CRN: 74353

 

Course: FYEX 1110FYEX 1010
Meets: M12:00 PM - 12:50 PM

TR2:00 PM - 3:15 PM

CRN: 7435365434
Instructors: Brian VineyardCash Clifton

FYEX 1110 for AISB is designed for incoming first-year, first-semester Native American students participating in the 2021 American Indian Summer Bridge Fall Experience. The course helps prepare students with the necessary skills to be successful at The University of New Mexico. The curriculum is designed to enhance scholarship searching, scholarship preparation skills, budgeting, study skills, and will introduce participants to various campus resources. The course also incorporates team-building activities, discussions on identity as Indigenous scholars, and navigating social justice issues as a college student.

Advisors - Please contact Daniel Begay for appropriate overrides. 

Course: FYEX 1110
Meets: MWF9:00 AM - 9:50 AM
Dane Smith Hall 226
CRN: 71446
Instructors: Pamela Agoyo

This Community is Full

A Humane Legacy: Human Rights Past and Present            

This course is an introduction to today’s human rights movement (the organizations and people working to promote and protect your rights).  We will learn its modern history which starts with the 1948 Universal Declaration of Human Rights and the birth of the United Nations. We will also discuss current events. Along the way, we will study the older history including the contributions of the major world religions and philosophies as well as the important events that led to today’s movement.  This multidisciplinary course will involve history, a little philosophy, and political science. We will rely on a variety of texts including one by a historian, memoirs by survivors, and other primary sources.  We will listen to music about human rights, watch film clips about human rights, and host guest speakers.
Course: HNRS 1120
Meets: MW10:30 AM - 11:45 AM
R.O. Anderson School of Mngmnt 1040
CRN: 69119
Instructors: Jonatha Kottler

“We know what makes people laugh. We do not know why they laugh.” W. C. Fields 
The Legacy of Comedy explores the complex, varied, and rich history of theatrical comedy. A fundamental question of the class is “how has humor changed over time?” We begin our search for the answers with the Greek and Roman comedies of Aristophanes and Plautus, followed by “A Midsummer Night’s Dream,” one of Shakespeare’s classic romantic comedies. We then explore the scandalous social critique underlying the satire in both Molière’s seventeenth-century French plays and Wycherley’s English Restoration plays, which we will compare to Congreve’s gentle eighteenth-century humor. Next, we investigate why Oscar Wilde was one of the Victorian Era’s best-loved wits, and why his humor still delights audiences today. Our exploration into twentieth-century theatre includes a vast array of talented comedic playwrights from around the world, such as French writer Yasmina Reza, Irishmen John Millington Synge and George Bernard Shaw, and one of the finest examples of American musical comedy from the 1950s, “Guys and Dolls.” As we proceed through the history of theatrical comedy, the class will explore the evolution and definitions of specific types of comedy, such as vaudeville, high comedy, low comedy, comedy of humors, comedy of manners, puns, theatrical pantomime, satire, farce, black comedy, stand-up comedy, and improvisation. Finally, we will contemplate the true meaning and purpose behind comedy. Does most comedy, as Arthur Koestler says, “contain elements of aggression and hostility, even savagery”? Or is comedy, as Paul Johnson and Shakespeare insist, “jolly and forgiving,” ultimately showing us the better aspects of being human? Or is comedy’s main function, in the words of theatre critic Ben Brantley, “to defuse bombs that in real life often explode and destroy”? Consider taking this Legacy to help us find out!

Course: HNRS 1120
Meets: TR9:30 AM - 10:45 AM
R.O. Anderson School of Mngmnt 1040
CRN: 69126
Instructors: Maria Szasz

This Community is Full

Course Description:

We often look at the heroes of a period to define what is important to that age; what they hope to accomplish and the means by which they accomplish it. Heroes, however, are reactive creatures; a great hero only rises in the face of great villainy. So, what really sets things into motion is the villain--the creature who sees the world as it is and wants to bend it to their own selfish design. Who are these catalysts? What do they want? And to what lengths will they go to achieve it? Finally, if one person’s villain is another’s hero, what makes a villain bad? What can Thanos, Loki, The Joker, Kylo Ren, Hela, Cersei Lannister, Vizzini and others tell us about their worlds and how the literary construct of villainy relates to modern reality?

Reading/Texts:

Medea, Beowulf, Othello, The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, The Lion the Witch and the Wardrobe, Coraline, Peter Pan, Selected fairy tales, a short selection of the IliadThor: Ragnarok, and others.

Student Requirements:

Attendance, Participation, Short Response Papers, Group Project, 2 analytic essays, Final Creative Project

Course: HNRS 1120
Meets: MW10:30 AM - 11:45 AM
R.O. Anderson School of Mngmnt 1040
CRN: 69119
Instructors: Jonatha Kottler

This Community is Full

This course is designed specifically for students who are considering a major or minor within the College of Arts and Sciences in Humanities-based disciplines.  It is co-taught by a unique combination of both Academic Advisors and graduate instructors, which offers a set of complementary perspectives and experience with supporting student success!  We will work together to help foster a healthy environment where students can understand and develop their transitional skills, learn to better navigate the university experience, explore their individual strengths, goals and identity, and learn how to approach future opportunities in undergraduate research!

Some of the many questions that we will be helping students explore include:
·       What does it mean to be a student at an R1 institution?  Am I in the right place?  Do I belong here?
·       What is “research” and should I get involved?  Why?  How?
·       How do I approach and communicate with my instructors and faculty?
·       What should I do if I am struggling in a class or in life?  Am I the only one who is feeling this way?
·       How am I supposed to manage going to school, working a job, spending time with family and friends, and still be able to function as a person?!
·       What do I have to do to actually get a degree?  How do I know what classes to take and when?
·       And much more…!
Course: ARSC 198
Meets: MWF9:00 AM - 9:50 AM
Education 101
CRN: 70927
Instructors: Emily Ahrend

This Community is Full

This course is designed specifically for students who are considering a major or minor within the College of Arts and Sciences in Humanities-based disciplines.  It is co-taught by a unique combination of both Academic Advisors and graduate instructors, which offers a set of complementary perspectives and experience with supporting student success!  We will work together to help foster a healthy environment where students can understand and develop their transitional skills, learn to better navigate the university experience, explore their individual strengths, goals and identity, and learn how to approach future opportunities in undergraduate research!

Some of the many questions that we will be helping students explore include:
·       What does it mean to be a student at an R1 institution?  Am I in the right place?  Do I belong here?
·       What is “research” and should I get involved?  Why?  How?
·       How do I approach and communicate with my instructors and faculty?
·       What should I do if I am struggling in a class or in life?  Am I the only one who is feeling this way?
·       How am I supposed to manage going to school, working a job, spending time with family and friends, and still be able to function as a person?!
·       What do I have to do to actually get a degree?  How do I know what classes to take and when?
·       And much more…!
Course: ARSC 198
Meets: MWF10:00 AM - 10:50 AM

CRN: 70928
Instructors:

This Community is Full

This course is designed specifically for students who are considering a major or minor within the College of Arts and Sciences in the disciplines of Social or Behavioral Sciences.  It is co-taught by a unique combination of both Academic Advisors and graduate instructors, which offers a set of complementary perspectives and experience with supporting student success!  We will work together to help foster a healthy environment where students can understand and develop their transitional skills, learn to better navigate the university experience, explore their individual strengths, goals and identity, and learn how to approach future opportunities in undergraduate research!

Some of the many questions that we will be helping students explore include:
·       What does it mean to be a student at an R1 institution?  Am I in the right place?  Do I belong here?
·       What is “research” and should I get involved?  Why?  How?
·       How do I approach and communicate with my instructors and faculty?
·       What should I do if I am struggling in a class or in life?  Am I the only one who is feeling this way?
·       How am I supposed to manage going to school, working a job, spending time with family and friends, and still be able to function as a person?!
·       What do I have to do to actually get a degree?  How do I know what classes to take and when?
·       And much more…!
Course: ARSC 198
Meets: MWF8:00 AM - 8:50 AM
Education 101
CRN: 70929
Instructors: Emily Ahrend

This Community is Full

This course is designed specifically for students who are considering a major or minor within the College of Arts and Sciences in the disciplines of Social or Behavioral Sciences.  It is co-taught by a unique combination of both Academic Advisors and graduate instructors, which offers a set of complementary perspectives and experience with supporting student success!  We will work together to help foster a healthy environment where students can understand and develop their transitional skills, learn to better navigate the university experience, explore their individual strengths, goals and identity, and learn how to approach future opportunities in undergraduate research!

Some of the many questions that we will be helping students explore include:
·       What does it mean to be a student at an R1 institution?  Am I in the right place?  Do I belong here?
·       What is “research” and should I get involved?  Why?  How?
·       How do I approach and communicate with my instructors and faculty?
·       What should I do if I am struggling in a class or in life?  Am I the only one who is feeling this way?
·       How am I supposed to manage going to school, working a job, spending time with family and friends, and still be able to function as a person?!
·       What do I have to do to actually get a degree?  How do I know what classes to take and when?
·       And much more…!
Course: ARSC 198
Meets: MWF3:00 PM - 3:50 PM
Dane Smith Hall 227
CRN: 70948
Instructors: Pablo Arias-Benavides

This Community is Full

This course is designed specifically for students who are considering a major or minor within the College of Arts and Sciences in the disciplines of Social or Behavioral Sciences. It is co-taught by a unique combination of both Academic Advisors and graduate instructors, which offers a set of complementary perspectives and experience with supporting student success!  We will work together to help foster a healthy environment where students can understand and develop their transitional skills, learn to better navigate the university experience, explore their individual strengths, goals and identity, and learn how to approach future opportunities in undergraduate research!

Some of the many questions that we will be helping students explore include:
·       What does it mean to be a student at an R1 institution?  Am I in the right place?  Do I belong here?
·       What is “research” and should I get involved?  Why?  How?
·       How do I approach and communicate with my instructors and faculty?
·       What should I do if I am struggling in a class or in life?  Am I the only one who is feeling this way?
·       How am I supposed to manage going to school, working a job, spending time with family and friends, and still be able to function as a person?!
·       What do I have to do to actually get a degree?  How do I know what classes to take and when?
·       And much more…!
Course: ARSC 198
Meets: TR3:30 PM - 4:45 PM
Dane Smith Hall 226
CRN: 70930
Instructors: Meghann Chavez

This Community is Full

This course is designed specifically for students who are considering a major or minor within the College of Arts and Sciences in STEM-based disciplines. It is co-taught by a unique combination of both Academic Advisors and graduate instructors, which offers a set of complementary perspectives and experience with supporting student success!  We will work together to help foster a healthy environment where students can understand and develop their transitional skills, learn to better navigate the university experience, explore their individual strengths, goals and identity, and learn how to approach future opportunities in undergraduate research!

Some of the many questions that we will be helping students explore include:
·       What does it mean to be a student at an R1 institution?  Am I in the right place?  Do I belong here?
·       What is “research” and should I get involved?  Why?  How?
·       How do I approach and communicate with my instructors and faculty?
·       What should I do if I am struggling in a class or in life?  Am I the only one who is feeling this way?
·       How am I supposed to manage going to school, working a job, spending time with family and friends, and still be able to function as a person?!
·       What do I have to do to actually get a degree?  How do I know what classes to take and when?
·       And much more…!
Course: ARSC 198
Meets: TR8:00 AM - 9:15 AM
Education 101
CRN: 70931
Instructors: Austin Bell

This Community is Full

This course is designed specifically for students who are considering a major or minor within the College of Arts and Sciences in STEM-based disciplines.  It is co-taught by a unique combination of both Academic Advisors and graduate instructors, which offers a set of complementary perspectives and experience with supporting student success!  We will work together to help foster a healthy environment where students can understand and develop their transitional skills, learn to better navigate the university experience, explore their individual strengths, goals and identity, and learn how to approach future opportunities in undergraduate research!

Some of the many questions that we will be helping students explore include:
·       What does it mean to be a student at an R1 institution?  Am I in the right place?  Do I belong here?
·       What is “research” and should I get involved?  Why?  How?
·       How do I approach and communicate with my instructors and faculty?
·       What should I do if I am struggling in a class or in life?  Am I the only one who is feeling this way?
·       How am I supposed to manage going to school, working a job, spending time with family and friends, and still be able to function as a person?!
·       What do I have to do to actually get a degree?  How do I know what classes to take and when?
·       And much more…!
Course: ARSC 198
Meets: TR9:30 AM - 10:45 AM

CRN: 70932
Instructors: Niko Doezema

This Community is Full

This course is designed specifically for students who are considering a major or minor within the College of Arts and Sciences in STEM-based disciplines.  It is co-taught by a unique combination of both Academic Advisors and graduate instructors, which offers a set of complementary perspectives and experience with supporting student success!  We will work together to help foster a healthy environment where students can understand and develop their transitional skills, learn to better navigate the university experience, explore their individual strengths, goals and identity, and learn how to approach future opportunities in undergraduate research!

Some of the many questions that we will be helping students explore include:
·       What does it mean to be a student at an R1 institution?  Am I in the right place?  Do I belong here?
·       What is “research” and should I get involved?  Why?  How?
·       How do I approach and communicate with my instructors and faculty?
·       What should I do if I am struggling in a class or in life?  Am I the only one who is feeling this way?
·       How am I supposed to manage going to school, working a job, spending time with family and friends, and still be able to function as a person?!
·       What do I have to do to actually get a degree?  How do I know what classes to take and when?
·       And much more…!
Course: ARSC 198
Meets: MWF2:00 PM - 2:50 PM
Dane Smith Hall 227
CRN: 70933
Instructors: Pablo Arias-Benavides
This course is designed specifically for students who are considering a major or minor within the College of Arts and Sciences in STEM-based disciplines.  It is co-taught by a unique combination of both Academic Advisors and graduate instructors, which offers a set of complementary perspectives and experience with supporting student success!  We will work together to help foster a healthy environment where students can understand and develop their transitional skills, learn to better navigate the university experience, explore their individual strengths, goals and identity, and learn how to approach future opportunities in undergraduate research!

Some of the many questions that we will be helping students explore include:
·       What does it mean to be a student at an R1 institution?  Am I in the right place?  Do I belong here?
·       What is “research” and should I get involved?  Why?  How?
·       How do I approach and communicate with my instructors and faculty?
·       What should I do if I am struggling in a class or in life?  Am I the only one who is feeling this way?
·       How am I supposed to manage going to school, working a job, spending time with family and friends, and still be able to function as a person?!
·       What do I have to do to actually get a degree?  How do I know what classes to take and when?
·       And much more…!
Course: ARSC 198
Meets:
CRN: 70934
Instructors:

This Community is Full

This course is designed specifically for students who are considering a major or minor within the College of Arts and Sciences in Humanities, Social, and Behavioral-based disciplines.  It is co-taught by a unique combination of both Academic Advisors and graduate instructors, which offers a set of complementary perspectives and experiences in supporting student success!  We will work together to help foster a healthy environment where students can understand and develop their transitional skills, learn to better navigate the university experience, explore their individual strengths, goals, and identity, and learn how to approach future opportunities in undergraduate research!

Some of the many questions that we will be helping students explore include:
·       What does it mean to be a student at an R1 institution?  Am I in the right place?  Do I belong here?
·       What is “research” and should I get involved?  Why?  How?
·       How do I approach and communicate with my instructors and faculty?
·       What should I do if I am struggling in a class or in life?  Am I the only one who is feeling this way?
·       How am I supposed to manage to go to school, work a job, spend time with family and friends, and still be able to function as a person?!
·       What do I have to do to actually get a degree?  How do I know what classes to take and when?
·       And much more…!
Course: ARSC 198
Meets: TR2:00 PM - 3:15 PM

CRN: 72245
Instructors: