Transition Communities

An Academic Gateway to College Success 

Transition Communities are one or three-credit first-year seminars that help students excel in their first year at UNM through fostering skills for academic success and helping students discover and connect to the university. Students who participate in the Transition Community Program can expect to sharpen college success skills, explore their majors, and develop their degree plans. Courses are offered for students in a variety of majors, affiliations, and interest areas.

Visit our faculty page to meet your Fall 2021 Transition Community professors!

FALL 2021 COURSE DESCRIPTIONS COMING SOON!

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Courses for Fall 2021

This Community is Full

Succeeding on the UNM College CAMPus is a course designed to assist students participating in the College Assistance Migrant Program (CAMP) in their transition into college. The objectives in this course are:

Knowledge

• To connect students with resources including libraries, tutoring centers, and recreation.

• To foster academic success with strategies essential for the workload of higher learning.

Skills

• To develop or strengthen critical thinking skills.

• To improve students’ public speaking and collaboration skills.

Attitudes and Values

• To encourage student reflection on their own personal backgrounds and life experiences.

• To foster understanding of how backgrounds and experiences positively impact success.

• To cultivate and enhance responsible citizenship beyond campus.

Course: FYEX 1110
Meets: TR12:30 PM - 1:45 PM
Dane Smith Hall 226
CRN: 63671
Instructors: Ivan Olay
This introductory course in architecture provides a roadmap to succeed in school, navigate the licensing process, and offers a wide understanding of this wonderful profession.
Course: FYEX 1110
Meets: M3:30 PM - 6:00 PM
George Pearl Hall P139
CRN: 63704
Instructors: Jose Zelaya

Explore Business will help orient students to college life while supporting students' transition to become engaged and successful in their academic coursework. This course will expose students to basic business concepts as well as Anderson School of Management faculty. This course is intentionally designed to promote student's self-awareness and success by empowering them with skills and strategies that promote lifelong learning.

Course: FYEX 1110
Meets: TR11:00 AM - 12:15 PM
Mitchell Hall 120
CRN: 63672
Instructors: Kelsey Molo

This Community is Full

If you can dream it, you can do it." -Walt Disney In this class we will discover how to believe in your dream and achieve the impossible. We will apply Disney leadership concepts as we explore overcoming obstacles, being creative thinkers, and working together as a team. We will uncover the secrets behind the entertainment empire's creation and learn how to apply them to your time at UNM. We will develop your confidence, create goals, and move toward achieving your dreams. We will explore how Disney continues to evolve with current culture, and how the Disney lessons you learned as a child translate to adulthood.

Course: FYEX 1110
Meets: TR2:00 PM - 3:15 PM
Castetter Hall (Biology) 57
CRN: 69382
Instructors: Tiffini Porter

This Community is Full

Are you looking to get a solid set of foundational skills to be successful in college? If your answer is “Yes,” then this course is for you! In Success Starts Here, you’ll have the opportunity to develop essential skills like time management, study strategies, and goal setting. We’ll learn about the variety of services for students across campus and how you can utilize them while at UNM. Most of all, this course is designed to help you explore who you are, why you are here, and what you need to be a successful college student. Your success starts here!

Course: FYEX 1110
Meets: MWF11:00 AM - 11:50 AM
Dane Smith Hall 225
CRN: 66580
Instructors: Lisa Montoya

University 101 is a three (3) credit hour course that is designed to help student athletes successfully transition into life and learning at the University. Students can expect to be introduced to the concepts and values of a University education, and of preparation in the university disciplines; the tradition, community, and diversity in Albuquerque and UNM; the refinement of academic, personal, and critical thinking skills; and will be introduced to the resources and services of the University.  In other words, UNIV 101 is: Everything you need for your first semester of college! This course will help student athletes learn how to handle social media, learn how to take tests more successfully, improve time management skills, learn how to study more effectively, discover ideas for your major and for what to do with your major, learn how to use library resources, learn how to adjust to college and Albuquerque, promote your own self-discovery, and learn how to think critically—all in one semester! 

Course: FYEX 1110
Meets: MWF10:00 AM - 10:50 AM
Mitchell Hall 121
CRN: 63705
Instructors: Cash Clifton

University 101 is a three (3) credit hour course that is designed to help student athletes successfully transition into life and learning at the University. Students can expect to be introduced to the concepts and values of a University education, and of preparation in the university disciplines; the tradition, community, and diversity in Albuquerque and UNM; the refinement of academic, personal, and critical thinking skills; and will be introduced to the resources and services of the University.  In other words, UNIV 101 is: Everything you need for your first semester of college! This course will help student athletes learn how to handle social media, learn how to take tests more successfully, improve time management skills, learn how to study more effectively, discover ideas for your major and for what to do with your major, learn how to use library resources, learn how to adjust to college and Albuquerque, promote your own self-discovery, and learn how to think critically—all in one semester!

Course: FYEX 1110
Meets: M5:30 PM - 8:00 PM
Dane Smith Hall 127
CRN: 63670
Instructors: Ryan Swanson

University 101 is a three (3) credit hour course that is designed to help student athletes successfully transition into life and learning at the University. Students can expect to be introduced to the concepts and values of a University education, and of preparation in the university disciplines; the tradition, community, and diversity in Albuquerque and UNM; the refinement of academic, personal, and critical thinking skills; and will be introduced to the resources and services of the University.  In other words, UNIV 101 is: Everything you need for your first semester of college! This course will help student athletes learn how to handle social media, learn how to take tests more successfully, improve time management skills, learn how to study more effectively, discover ideas for your major and for what to do with your major, learn how to use library resources, learn how to adjust to college and Albuquerque, promote your own self-discovery, and learn how to think critically—all in one semester!

Course: FYEX 1110
Meets: TR9:30 AM - 10:45 AM
Mitchell Hall 206
CRN: 63663
Instructors: Corine Gonzales

FYEX 1110 for AISB is designed for incoming first-year, first-semester Native American students participating in the 2021 American Indian Summer Bridge Fall Experience. The course helps prepare students with the necessary skills to be successful at The University of New Mexico. The curriculum is designed to enhance scholarship searching, scholarship preparation skills, budgeting, study skills, and will introduce participants to various campus resources. The course also incorporates team-building activities, discussions on identity as Indigenous scholars, and navigating social justice issues as a college student.

Advisors - Please contact Daniel Begay for appropriate overrides. 

Course: FYEX 1110
Meets: MWF9:00 AM - 9:50 AM
Dane Smith Hall 226
CRN: 71446
Instructors: Daniel Begay

Intro to UNM: International Students is a required Course for Amigo and Leadership Scholarship Recipients

Intro to UNM: Strategies for Academic Success in the American University System is designed specifically to ensure that you are given the proper tools and guidance to excel at UNM. Topics will include: adjustment to the American education system, use of UNM online learning systems, communication strategies with instructors and peers, academic resources on campus, and tools to successfully navigate your degree from start to finish.

This course will be taught using a combination of classroom lecture and discussion, small group activities, ongoing personal reflection, guest speakers, and one out-of-class assignment. Optional group study sessions will also be available throughout the course of this class. 

 

Course: FYEX 1110
Meets: F8:00 AM - 9:15 AM
Remote Instruction UNM LEARN
CRN: 71448
Instructors: Lisa Montoya

This Community is Full

A Humane Legacy: Human Rights Past and Present            

This course is an introduction to today’s human rights movement (the organizations and people working to promote and protect your rights).  We will learn its modern history which starts with the 1948 Universal Declaration of Human Rights and the birth of the United Nations. We will also discuss current events. Along the way, we will study the older history including the contributions of the major world religions and philosophies as well as the important events that led to today’s movement.  This multidisciplinary course will involve history, a little philosophy, and political science. We will rely on a variety of texts including one by a historian, memoirs by survivors, and other primary sources.  We will listen to music about human rights, watch film clips about human rights, and host guest speakers.
Course: HNRS 1120
Meets: MW3:00 PM - 4:15 PM
R.O. Anderson Grad Sch of Mgmt 128
CRN: 69129
Instructors: Sarita Cargas

This Community is Full

“We know what makes people laugh. We do not know why they laugh.” W. C. Fields 
The Legacy of Comedy explores the complex, varied, and rich history of theatrical comedy. A fundamental question of the class is “how has humor changed over time?” We begin our search for the answers with the Greek and Roman comedies of Aristophanes and Plautus, followed by “A Midsummer Night’s Dream,” one of Shakespeare’s classic romantic comedies. We then explore the scandalous social critique underlying the satire in both Molière’s seventeenth-century French plays and Wycherley’s English Restoration plays, which we will compare to Congreve’s gentle eighteenth-century humor. Next, we investigate why Oscar Wilde was one of the Victorian Era’s best-loved wits, and why his humor still delights audiences today. Our exploration into twentieth-century theatre includes a vast array of talented comedic playwrights from around the world, such as French writer Yasmina Reza, Irishmen John Millington Synge and George Bernard Shaw, and one of the finest examples of American musical comedy from the 1950s, “Guys and Dolls.” As we proceed through the history of theatrical comedy, the class will explore the evolution and definitions of specific types of comedy, such as vaudeville, high comedy, low comedy, comedy of humors, comedy of manners, puns, theatrical pantomime, satire, farce, black comedy, stand-up comedy, and improvisation. Finally, we will contemplate the true meaning and purpose behind comedy. Does most comedy, as Arthur Koestler says, “contain elements of aggression and hostility, even savagery”? Or is comedy, as Paul Johnson and Shakespeare insist, “jolly and forgiving,” ultimately showing us the better aspects of being human? Or is comedy’s main function, in the words of theatre critic Ben Brantley, “to defuse bombs that in real life often explode and destroy”? Consider taking this Legacy to help us find out!

Course: HNRS 1120
Meets: TR9:30 AM - 10:45 AM
R.O. Anderson School of Mngmnt 1004
CRN: 69126
Instructors: Maria Szasz

At its most ideal, the American system allows individuals to exercise their rights unimpeded by others. But as recent debates over issues such free speech and immigration suggest, while Americans share a government, they buy into a wide range of dramatically differing values—values so divergent that sometimes it is difficult to understand how we might reconcile them to forge meaningful law and policy. To better understand this problem, this class will explore theories about the role of government. Aristotle, for example, argues that every community aims at some good; what might our “good” be, and how can we best achieve it? To help refine our ideas, we will consider Locke’s Second Treatise of Government and Mill’s On Liberty, both fundamental to understanding our own system, as well as Yevgeny Zamyatin’s science fiction novel We, which asks whether it is better to be “happy” than to be “free.” We will also explore the distinction between violence and power suggested by Hannah Arendt and the ways in which economic, racial, and gender injustice are detailed in works by William Shakespeare and Harriet Jacobs. Through readings, discussion, and debate, we will make ourselves more thoughtful, better-informed participants in our political system. For further information, please contact Dr. Renée Faubion at sanren@unm.edu. 

Course: HNRS 1120
Meets: TR8:00 AM - 9:15 AM
R.O. Anderson School of Mngmnt 1040
CRN: 69130
Instructors: Sandria Faubion

Course Description:

We often look at the heroes of a period to define what is important to that age; what they hope to accomplish and the means by which they accomplish it. Heroes, however, are reactive creatures; a great hero only rises in the face of great villainy. So, what really sets things into motion is the villain--the creature who sees the world as it is and wants to bend it to their own selfish design. Who are these catalysts? What do they want? And to what lengths will they go to achieve it? Finally, if one person’s villain is another’s hero, what makes a villain bad? What can Thanos, Loki, The Joker, Kylo Ren, Hela, Cersei Lannister, Vizzini and others tell us about their worlds and how the literary construct of villainy relates to modern reality?

Reading/Texts:

Medea, Beowulf, Othello, The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, The Lion the Witch and the Wardrobe, Coraline, Peter Pan, Selected fairy tales, a short selection of the IliadThor: Ragnarok, and others.

Student Requirements:

Attendance, Participation, Short Response Papers, Group Project, 2 analytic essays, Final Creative Project

Course: HNRS 1120
Meets: MW10:30 AM - 11:45 AM
R.O. Anderson School of Mngmnt 1040
CRN: 69119
Instructors: Jonatha Kottler
This course is designed specifically for students who are considering a major or minor within the College of Arts and Sciences in Humanities-based disciplines.  It is co-taught by a unique combination of both Academic Advisors and graduate instructors, which offers a set of complementary perspectives and experience with supporting student success!  We will work together to help foster a healthy environment where students can understand and develop their transitional skills, learn to better navigate the university experience, explore their individual strengths, goals and identity, and learn how to approach future opportunities in undergraduate research!

Some of the many questions that we will be helping students explore include:
·       What does it mean to be a student at an R1 institution?  Am I in the right place?  Do I belong here?
·       What is “research” and should I get involved?  Why?  How?
·       How do I approach and communicate with my instructors and faculty?
·       What should I do if I am struggling in a class or in life?  Am I the only one who is feeling this way?
·       How am I supposed to manage going to school, working a job, spending time with family and friends, and still be able to function as a person?!
·       What do I have to do to actually get a degree?  How do I know what classes to take and when?
·       And much more…!
Course: ARSC 198
Meets: MWF9:00 AM - 9:50 AM
Education 101
CRN: 70927
Instructors: Alana Bock
This course is designed specifically for students who are considering a major or minor within the College of Arts and Sciences in Humanities-based disciplines.  It is co-taught by a unique combination of both Academic Advisors and graduate instructors, which offers a set of complementary perspectives and experience with supporting student success!  We will work together to help foster a healthy environment where students can understand and develop their transitional skills, learn to better navigate the university experience, explore their individual strengths, goals and identity, and learn how to approach future opportunities in undergraduate research!

Some of the many questions that we will be helping students explore include:
·       What does it mean to be a student at an R1 institution?  Am I in the right place?  Do I belong here?
·       What is “research” and should I get involved?  Why?  How?
·       How do I approach and communicate with my instructors and faculty?
·       What should I do if I am struggling in a class or in life?  Am I the only one who is feeling this way?
·       How am I supposed to manage going to school, working a job, spending time with family and friends, and still be able to function as a person?!
·       What do I have to do to actually get a degree?  How do I know what classes to take and when?
·       And much more…!
Course: ARSC 198
Meets: MWF2:00 PM - 2:50 PM
Mitchell Hall 120
CRN: 70928
Instructors: Dylan Maynard
This course is designed specifically for students who are considering a major or minor within the College of Arts and Sciences in the disciplines of Social or Behavioral Sciences.  It is co-taught by a unique combination of both Academic Advisors and graduate instructors, which offers a set of complementary perspectives and experience with supporting student success!  We will work together to help foster a healthy environment where students can understand and develop their transitional skills, learn to better navigate the university experience, explore their individual strengths, goals and identity, and learn how to approach future opportunities in undergraduate research!

Some of the many questions that we will be helping students explore include:
·       What does it mean to be a student at an R1 institution?  Am I in the right place?  Do I belong here?
·       What is “research” and should I get involved?  Why?  How?
·       How do I approach and communicate with my instructors and faculty?
·       What should I do if I am struggling in a class or in life?  Am I the only one who is feeling this way?
·       How am I supposed to manage going to school, working a job, spending time with family and friends, and still be able to function as a person?!
·       What do I have to do to actually get a degree?  How do I know what classes to take and when?
·       And much more…!
Course: ARSC 198
Meets: MWF8:00 AM - 8:50 AM
Education 101
CRN: 70929
Instructors: Edrea Mendoza

This Community is Full

This course is designed specifically for students who are considering a major or minor within the College of Arts and Sciences in the disciplines of Social or Behavioral Sciences.  It is co-taught by a unique combination of both Academic Advisors and graduate instructors, which offers a set of complementary perspectives and experience with supporting student success!  We will work together to help foster a healthy environment where students can understand and develop their transitional skills, learn to better navigate the university experience, explore their individual strengths, goals and identity, and learn how to approach future opportunities in undergraduate research!

Some of the many questions that we will be helping students explore include:
·       What does it mean to be a student at an R1 institution?  Am I in the right place?  Do I belong here?
·       What is “research” and should I get involved?  Why?  How?
·       How do I approach and communicate with my instructors and faculty?
·       What should I do if I am struggling in a class or in life?  Am I the only one who is feeling this way?
·       How am I supposed to manage going to school, working a job, spending time with family and friends, and still be able to function as a person?!
·       What do I have to do to actually get a degree?  How do I know what classes to take and when?
·       And much more…!
Course: ARSC 198
Meets: MW3:00 PM - 3:50 PM
Dane Smith Hall 227
F3:00 PM - 3:50 PM
Remote Instruction UNM LEARN
CRN: 70948
Instructors: Ryan Smith
This course is designed specifically for students who are considering a major or minor within the College of Arts and Sciences in the disciplines of Social or Behavioral Sciences. It is co-taught by a unique combination of both Academic Advisors and graduate instructors, which offers a set of complementary perspectives and experience with supporting student success!  We will work together to help foster a healthy environment where students can understand and develop their transitional skills, learn to better navigate the university experience, explore their individual strengths, goals and identity, and learn how to approach future opportunities in undergraduate research!

Some of the many questions that we will be helping students explore include:
·       What does it mean to be a student at an R1 institution?  Am I in the right place?  Do I belong here?
·       What is “research” and should I get involved?  Why?  How?
·       How do I approach and communicate with my instructors and faculty?
·       What should I do if I am struggling in a class or in life?  Am I the only one who is feeling this way?
·       How am I supposed to manage going to school, working a job, spending time with family and friends, and still be able to function as a person?!
·       What do I have to do to actually get a degree?  How do I know what classes to take and when?
·       And much more…!
Course: ARSC 198
Meets: TR3:30 PM - 4:45 PM
Dane Smith Hall 226
CRN: 70930
Instructors: Austin Bell

This Community is Full

This course is designed specifically for students who are considering a major or minor within the College of Arts and Sciences in STEM-based disciplines. It is co-taught by a unique combination of both Academic Advisors and graduate instructors, which offers a set of complementary perspectives and experience with supporting student success!  We will work together to help foster a healthy environment where students can understand and develop their transitional skills, learn to better navigate the university experience, explore their individual strengths, goals and identity, and learn how to approach future opportunities in undergraduate research!

Some of the many questions that we will be helping students explore include:
·       What does it mean to be a student at an R1 institution?  Am I in the right place?  Do I belong here?
·       What is “research” and should I get involved?  Why?  How?
·       How do I approach and communicate with my instructors and faculty?
·       What should I do if I am struggling in a class or in life?  Am I the only one who is feeling this way?
·       How am I supposed to manage going to school, working a job, spending time with family and friends, and still be able to function as a person?!
·       What do I have to do to actually get a degree?  How do I know what classes to take and when?
·       And much more…!
Course: ARSC 198
Meets: TR8:00 AM - 9:15 AM
Education 101
CRN: 70931
Instructors: Erica Pauer

This Community is Full

This course is designed specifically for students who are considering a major or minor within the College of Arts and Sciences in STEM-based disciplines.  It is co-taught by a unique combination of both Academic Advisors and graduate instructors, which offers a set of complementary perspectives and experience with supporting student success!  We will work together to help foster a healthy environment where students can understand and develop their transitional skills, learn to better navigate the university experience, explore their individual strengths, goals and identity, and learn how to approach future opportunities in undergraduate research!

Some of the many questions that we will be helping students explore include:
·       What does it mean to be a student at an R1 institution?  Am I in the right place?  Do I belong here?
·       What is “research” and should I get involved?  Why?  How?
·       How do I approach and communicate with my instructors and faculty?
·       What should I do if I am struggling in a class or in life?  Am I the only one who is feeling this way?
·       How am I supposed to manage going to school, working a job, spending time with family and friends, and still be able to function as a person?!
·       What do I have to do to actually get a degree?  How do I know what classes to take and when?
·       And much more…!
Course: ARSC 198
Meets: MWF1:00 PM - 1:50 PM
Dane Smith Hall 227
CRN: 70932
Instructors: Mason Bray

This Community is Full

This course is designed specifically for students who are considering a major or minor within the College of Arts and Sciences in STEM-based disciplines.  It is co-taught by a unique combination of both Academic Advisors and graduate instructors, which offers a set of complementary perspectives and experience with supporting student success!  We will work together to help foster a healthy environment where students can understand and develop their transitional skills, learn to better navigate the university experience, explore their individual strengths, goals and identity, and learn how to approach future opportunities in undergraduate research!

Some of the many questions that we will be helping students explore include:
·       What does it mean to be a student at an R1 institution?  Am I in the right place?  Do I belong here?
·       What is “research” and should I get involved?  Why?  How?
·       How do I approach and communicate with my instructors and faculty?
·       What should I do if I am struggling in a class or in life?  Am I the only one who is feeling this way?
·       How am I supposed to manage going to school, working a job, spending time with family and friends, and still be able to function as a person?!
·       What do I have to do to actually get a degree?  How do I know what classes to take and when?
·       And much more…!
Course: ARSC 198
Meets: MWF2:00 PM - 2:50 PM
Dane Smith Hall 227
CRN: 70933
Instructors: Stephanie Fox
This course is designed specifically for students who are considering a major or minor within the College of Arts and Sciences in STEM-based disciplines.  It is co-taught by a unique combination of both Academic Advisors and graduate instructors, which offers a set of complementary perspectives and experience with supporting student success!  We will work together to help foster a healthy environment where students can understand and develop their transitional skills, learn to better navigate the university experience, explore their individual strengths, goals and identity, and learn how to approach future opportunities in undergraduate research!

Some of the many questions that we will be helping students explore include:
·       What does it mean to be a student at an R1 institution?  Am I in the right place?  Do I belong here?
·       What is “research” and should I get involved?  Why?  How?
·       How do I approach and communicate with my instructors and faculty?
·       What should I do if I am struggling in a class or in life?  Am I the only one who is feeling this way?
·       How am I supposed to manage going to school, working a job, spending time with family and friends, and still be able to function as a person?!
·       What do I have to do to actually get a degree?  How do I know what classes to take and when?
·       And much more…!
Course: ARSC 198
Meets: MWF3:00 PM - 3:50 PM
Mitchell Hall 120
CRN: 70934
Instructors: Stephanie Fox

This Community is Full

This course is designed specifically for students who are considering a major or minor within the College of Arts and Sciences in Humanities, Social, and Behavioral based disciplines.  It is co-taught by a unique combination of both Academic Advisors and graduate instructors, which offers a set of complementary perspectives and experience with supporting student success!  We will work together to help foster a healthy environment where students can understand and develop their transitional skills, learn to better navigate the university experience, explore their individual strengths, goals and identity, and learn how to approach future opportunities in undergraduate research!

Some of the many questions that we will be helping students explore include:
·       What does it mean to be a student at an R1 institution?  Am I in the right place?  Do I belong here?
·       What is “research” and should I get involved?  Why?  How?
·       How do I approach and communicate with my instructors and faculty?
·       What should I do if I am struggling in a class or in life?  Am I the only one who is feeling this way?
·       How am I supposed to manage going to school, working a job, spending time with family and friends, and still be able to function as a person?!
·       What do I have to do to actually get a degree?  How do I know what classes to take and when?
·       And much more…!
Course: ARSC 198
Meets: TR9:30 AM - 10:45 AM
Remote Instruction UNM LEARN
CRN: 71666
Instructors: Joseph Hall-Patton