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First-Year Learning Communities



Lobo LouieWhat is a First-Year Learning Community (FLC)?

  • FLCs are two classes that are taught together around a theme
  • FLCs explore connections between the two areas and how they intersect and connect
  • One of the classes is a Seminar (a small class with a theme)
  • The Seminar is linked with a course that’s part of UNM Core
  • These classes are taught using cooperative and collaborative learning methods that engage you as an active, involved learner, with a minimum of “lecture”
  • The discussions, readings, problems, papers and presentations of the Seminar and the linked course are integrated and unified
  • Each class holds up to 25 students


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Courses for Fall 2017

Atomic Algebra

Take the nuclear option!   Combining College Algebra with General Chemistry I lab and lecture, this Freshman Learning Community will be a blast!  It is specially designed by a team of math and chemistry professors to let you into the secret of one of the most important tools in science - math!  You will develop your critical thinking and problem-solving skills, as well as your math superpowers to help you triumph in chemistry and future science classes.

Combines: CHEM 121MATH 121CHEM 123L
Meets: MWF12:00 PM - 12:50 PM
Collaborative Teaching & Learn 300
MWF1:00 PM - 1:50 PM

W3:00 PM - 5:50 PM
Science Math Learning Center 260
CRN: 603766055731300
Dancing Through Time: From the Cave to Krump

Dancing through Time will explore the ever-changing role of dance throughout human history. We will look at the place of dance in culture, exposing our class to a wide variety of social and theatrical dance forms. In this lecture-based FLC, we will learn about and attempt a range of dances from the Waltz to Swing, Ballet to Hip Hop. Students will experience each dance form for themselves. For the English portion of the FLC, we will examine dance in a variety of written genres. We'll explore the discourse community of dance, discussing aspects of speech and language used by those in the dance community. We will read about, think about, write about, and talk about dance as work, play, worship, and art. We will ultimately be questioning, “What is dance?" 

Combines: DANC 105ENGL 110
Meets: MW9:30 AM - 10:45 AM
Cons for Env Rsrch, Info & Art 365
MWF11:00 AM - 11:50 AM
Mitchell Hall 218
CRN: 5765850434
The Art of Argument

The most important skill you will learn in college is not how to write code, or how to construct a two-by-two matrix, or how to complete a 10,000-word semester-long essay assignment in 24 hours, fueled entirely by Red Bull and Bugles. The most important skill you will learn in college is how to make an argument. Why not learn from the best? In this course, we will study some of the top arguers in modern history—from Edmund Burke to Frederick Douglass to Simone de Beauvoir to Hannah Arendt—arguing about the big issues that continue to shape our world today. By studying not only what, when, where and why they wrote and said what they did but also how they wrote and said it, you will learn the art of argument.

Combines: HIST 102CJ 130
Meets: MWF10:00 AM - 10:50 AM
Mitchell Hall 122
MWF11:00 AM - 11:50 AM
Mitchell Hall 217
CRN: 6037560373
Let's Talk Health

Nearly two of every three Americans is strongly interested in their health. From family members stricken with heart disease or cancer, to global outbreaks of Ebola and domestic cases of influenza, exercise and diet, health care access to medical expenses and policy, sex to drugs, immunization debates that pit individual freedoms vs greater common good, college alcohol policies for underage drinking and many, many others, how and what we talk about these issues individually, with our peers and from a local, state, national and global policy level is critical. Let's Talk Health integrates two fundamental courses relevant to building understanding across varied perspectives that can establish practices, programs and policies that help people become and stay healthier in the places where they work, live and play; Introduction to Population Health PH 101 and Public Speaking C&J 130. Come join us for a lively and informative exchanges about these health issues and more.

Combines: PH 101CJ 130
Meets: MWF9:00 AM - 9:50 AM
Sara Raynolds Hall 107
MWF10:00 AM - 10:50 AM
Communication & Journalism 119
CRN: 5446054461
How to Become a Person

Are you curious about people?  Are you curious about yourself?  Do you want to learn more about how to become a person?  If so, we have an FLC for you!  Becoming a person is not easy, and achieving your goals in life will take some major skill.  Yet, maybe we can get some help!  In this FLC we will set off to discover how people work.  With the assistance of our link with Public Speaking, we will actively engage a wide variety of topics in psychology.  At every point along the way, we will pause to consider how theory and research in psychology relates to the most important issues in our lives.  If successful, our efforts will result in a better understanding of how to become the person we wish to be.

Combines: PSY 105CJ 130
Meets: MWF10:00 AM - 10:50 AM
Mitchell Hall 215
MWF11:00 AM - 11:50 AM
Mitchell Hall 215
CRN: 2214340371
Microbes - Friends or Foes?

Not just germs!  We now know that microbes are critical to keeping humans (and other animals) healthy, thin, and happy. Some microbes do cause disease, but come learn how to avoid becoming infected. Other microbes are the true engineers of our planet, helping to make the air we breathe and our food and drink. Classroom activities and assignments include field-trips to a cave, hot springs and local brewery; microbial growth experiments; simulated disease investigations; writing a children’s story about microbes; blogging about microbes in the news; and more. This is a hands-on approach to the wonderfully intriguing world of microbes. Group discussions will help you learn to think critically about microbes. The ideas that you encounter in the seminar will be carried over into ENGL 110, where you will write about microbial topics. 

Combines: ENGL 110BIOL 110
Meets: TR12:30 PM - 1:45 PM
Mitchell Hall 219
R2:00 PM - 3:15 PM
Castetter Hall (Biology) 41
T2:00 PM - 3:15 PM
Castetter Hall (Biology) 107
CRN: 5046248363
21st Century Health Challenges

What will it take in the 21st century to address the world’s most challenging health issues? In this class, you will learn how different professions - medicine, engineering, social science, and law, to name a few - collaborate to solve problems ranging from infectious disease to gun violence. If you are interested in meeting compelling guest speakers, going on fun field trips, and working on projects that make a difference in the world, this class is for you!

Combines: ARSC 198ENGL 110
Meets: TR9:30 AM - 10:45 AM
Mitchell Hall 215
TR11:00 AM - 12:15 PM
Mitchell Hall 215
CRN: 3759150452
Telling Tales: Introduction to the Study of Language

If you like the idea of a StorySlam, then this is the class for you!  Through the context of stories, students are introduced to the structure of language (sounds, words, sentences, meanings).  Other topics include child language acquisition, language change, social dialects, bilingualism, signed languages, animal communication, language and thought, and more.  No background in linguistics, grammar, or other languages is assumed.

Combines: ENGL 120LING 101
Meets: MWF12:00 PM - 12:50 PM
Mitchell Hall 219
MWF1:00 PM - 1:50 PM
Mitchell Hall 215
CRN: 5055243916
The Language of Change

This course examines the representation of issues related to language, identity and various forms of change and/or resistance in the works of selected African American writers. We will read prose fiction and poetry, paying attention to how each writer treats concerns such as language, history, ethnicity, class, and gender ideologies. As we read each of these works we will consider how strategies of change and/or resistance, identity and politics intersect with each other. We will also focus on how men and women are impacted by, and implicated in the concerns we explore, and consider how the writers’ stylistic choices are linked to change, resistance and identity. Our texts will include works by David Walker, Sojourner Truth, Henry Hiland Garnett, Ida B. Wells, Huey P.Newton, Ella Baker and Cornell West to name a few.

Combines: AFST 104CJ 130
Meets: MWF10:00 AM - 10:50 AM
Mitchell Hall 219
MWF11:00 AM - 11:50 AM
Mitchell Hall 219
CRN: 5446827048
Chicana/o Civil Rights Movement & the Law

This course introduces students to the interdisciplinary field of Chicana/o Studies and the diversity of experiences of Chicano/Hispano/Mexicano people(s). Students will explore the intersections of culture, place, and history as they impact Mexican and Latino descent communities in the United States. In order to appreciate the lives and experiences of Mexican descent people in the United States in their fullness, we need to understand their historical and cultural heritage and how historical events have shaped their lives and continue to influence their lived experiences, cultural practices, and creative expressions. The course will simultaneously maintain a thematic focus on the historical development of Chicana and Chicano Studies as a field and explore topics such as art, history, politics, literature, arts and media, popular culture, and the related issues of race/ethnicity, class, gender, and sexuality.

Combines: ENGL 110CCS 201
Meets: TR11:00 AM - 12:15 PM
Mitchell Hall 218
TR12:30 PM - 1:45 PM
Mitchell Hall 218
CRN: 5045747530
So, You Want to be a Doctor?

This course is designed to give new students who identify themselves as "pre-medical students" insights into medicine as a career as well as some of the intricacies of the medical school admission process.  Utilizing a variety of readings, small group discussion and interactions with current medical students and practicing physicians, students will have a chance to reflect on the strengths and skills required of physicians as well as some of the demands made on individuals choosing the profession.  They will also hear from representatives from the UNM Hospital volunteer office about opportunities which may potentially strengthen a medical school application and from the UNM SOM Office of Admissions about mistakes made commonly on applications.

Combines: ARSC 198CJ 130
Meets: MWF8:00 AM - 8:50 AM
Mitchell Hall 219
MWF9:00 AM - 9:50 AM
Communication & Journalism 119
CRN: 5446954470
So, You Want to be a Doctor?

This course is designed to give new students who identify themselves as "pre-medical students" insights into medicine as a career as well as some of the intricacies of the medical school admission process.  Utilizing a variety of readings, small group discussion and interactions with current medical students and practicing physicians, students will have a chance to reflect on the strengths and skills required of physicians as well as some of the demands made on individuals choosing the profession.  They will also hear from representatives from the UNM Hospital volunteer office about opportunities which may potentially strengthen a medical school application and from the UNM SOM Office of Admissions about mistakes made commonly on applications.

Combines: ARSC 198CJ 130
Meets: MWF10:00 AM - 10:50 AM
Mitchell Hall 213
MWF11:00 AM - 11:50 AM
Mitchell Hall 213
CRN: 5447254471
Harry Potter & Censoring Children's Books

If you need to take English 120, then why not take it with an English 150 and earn credit for two core English classes? This is an opportunity to write essays about the kinds of books that you love to read. If you love Harry Potter and fairy tales like Beauty and the Beast or remember the picture books of your childhood, why not write essays about these books?  In this Learning Community 620 class we will examine the ways in which literature for children and young adults is governed by the social, religious, and political influences that a particular community embraces.  Should children’s books focus on topics such as child abuse? Should books celebrate disobedience by children or use certain four-letter words that might offend parents? Should fairy tales be censored because they are not politically correct? While we may not be able to resolve these issues, we will emerge from this class with a better understanding of the interaction between community values, censorship, and children’s books. 

Combines: ENGL 150ENGL 120
Meets: MWF9:00 AM - 9:50 AM
Ortega Hall 217
MWF10:00 AM - 10:50 AM
Ortega Hall 217
CRN: 2209050553
EarthArts - A Wild Way of Knowing

We'll trace a historical timeline of creative human activity that zig-zags across the globe while we discover what is in NM's backyard. We'll visit Chaco Canyon, a World Heritage Site, as well as explore the natural formations of Tent Rocks - two destinations sure to draw out our own creative natures. We'll learn how ancient cultures recorded their connections to the natural world through their creative expressions of cave paintings, petroglyphs, and geoglyphs on through the human timeline to today's eco-artists. We'll make clay effigies and design mandalas referencing ecosystems. We'll also develop technology skills creating visual presentations that reflect our field and research practices towards developing lasting skill sets useful in your college career in any discipline. 

Combines: ENGL 110FA 284
Meets: TR11:00 AM - 12:15 PM
Mitchell Hall 212
TR12:30 PM - 1:45 PM
Mitchell Hall 212
CRN: 5046026599
Ethics in Organizations

Can a truly ethical person be successful in business, education, engineering, health-related fields, science and technology, and other careers? How do serious ethical lapses happen in our organizations today? From the extreme ethical transgressions of former business “leaders” like those at Enron, WorldCom and Tyco, and on the part of individuals like Bernie Madoff, Martha Stewart and  Albuquerque’s own ponzi-schemer Doug Vaughn, how does this happen?  This FLC will explore the ethical challenges in organizations and focus on how to use ethical principles to deal with them.  Students will examine personal and organizational ethics in the workplace - with case studies, field trips, guest speakers and more.

Combines: MGMT 158ENGL 110
Meets: TR12:30 PM - 1:45 PM
Mitchell Hall 109
TR2:00 PM - 3:15 PM
Mitchell Hall 109
CRN: 2213150468
Ceramic Seduction

Introduction to Ceramics is a "hands-on" art studio experience that introduces students to the terms, concepts, historical, and technical information that support creative development. Students will discover the methods of hand building, throwing on the wheel, and the dynamics of different clay bodies. This studio is a creative incubator and learning laboratory. Reduction and atmospheric firings, readings, lecturers, guest speakers, and field trips are included. This course provides a lifelong enjoyment of ceramics and all its diverse reflection of human development through time and the aesthetic qualities that clay possesses. Students' own clay creations will reflect their first studio experience in the UNM College of Fine Art.

Combines: ENGL 110ARTS 168
Meets: TR11:00 AM - 12:15 PM
Masley Hall (Art Education) 210
TR12:30 PM - 3:15 PM
Masley Hall (Art Education) 110
CRN: 5046537585
The Space-Age Epic

The dates for this interdisciplinary analysis of the fantasy and reality of space travel – from the mid-1950s to the early 1980s – span the period from the launch of Sputnik I to the first Challenger shuttle mission. Grounded in literature, film, music, history, cultural studies, and philosophy, the course is based on popular notions of science “fiction” becoming thinkable possibility, even “fact.” Beginning shortly after the so-called Golden Age of science fiction and stopping just before Ridley Scott and William Gibson produced the masterpieces that helped give rise to the Steampunk/Cyberpunk as a popular aesthetic, it adopts the New Wave focus on the person holding the “gizmo” rather than the “gizmo” itself.

Combines: ENGL 120ENGL 150
Meets: TR12:30 PM - 1:45 PM
Mitchell Hall 106
TR2:00 PM - 3:15 PM
Mitchell Hall 106
CRN: 5055426536
Framing Your World

Learn the foundations and ideas of filmmaking and editing, and show your world. This class will focus on ways to express your experiences in your own personal way, and ways to document your community and history. We will work together through several short, small group and individual projects, including documentary storytelling, stop-motion animation, and creating fictional narratives.  Students will practice technical and creative skills, critical thinking, project planning, and positive problem solving with others and on their own.

Combines: MA 111ENGL 110
Meets: TR9:00 AM - 10:45 AM
Cons for Env Rsrch, Info & Art 365
TR11:00 AM - 12:15 PM
Mitchell Hall 118
CRN: 5124650466
Techie Computational Memes

We have all encountered Internet memes. Examples include YouTube videos with millions of hits and Facebook pictures shared thousands of times. Just as biological systems spread genes, social systems spread memes. A meme is a package of information that people naturally like to spread and an Internet meme is an entertaining one spread via social media. In this LC, we will understand the cognitive science behind memes and learn how to create them using digital media, including Photoshop, Premier, and After-Effects. We will work individually and in teams to create Twitter, Facebook, and YouTube memes. Finally, we will explore the creation of interactive memes based on datasets and how they are disseminated via apps.

Combines: MGMT 190CS 151L
Meets: MW10:00 AM - 11:20 AM
R.O. Anderson School of Mngmnt 1070
MWF1:00 PM - 1:50 PM
Woodward Lecture Hall 101
W12:00 PM - 12:50 PM
Centennial Engineering Center 2094
CRN: 4754558118
Music, Media & Spoken Word in Politics

From the rhythmic influences of hip hop and Latin-based music to the word flow raps of urban slam poets, this FLC explores how issues of race, class, gender and sexuality have shaped historic and contemporary Latino societies and cultures. In particular, students examine how Native American, Latino, European, African and Asian descent peoples have shaped the development of Mexican American communities in the United States. In addition, students will assess how narratives of agency, adaptation, survival, resistance and resilience are constructed and used to make claims to cultural citizenship and human rights. As part of exploring multiethnic and multicultural narratives, students will develop an understanding of concepts such as identity, place, and memory making. Using course materials, multimedia approaches and digital tools, students will work together to construct their own narratives of self and community.

 

Combines: CCS 201UNIV 106
Meets: TR9:30 AM - 10:45 AM
Collaborative Teaching & Learn 300
TR11:00 AM - 12:15 PM
Mitchell Hall 217
CRN: 5123958130
Music, Media & Spoken Word in Politics

From the rhythmic influences of hip hop and Latin-based music to the word flow raps of urban slam poets, this FLC explores how issues of race, class, gender and sexuality have shaped historic and contemporary Latino societies and cultures. In particular, students examine how Native American, Latino, European, African and Asian descent peoples have shaped the development of Mexican American communities in the United States. In addition, students will assess how narratives of agency, adaptation, survival, resistance and resilience are constructed and used to make claims to cultural citizenship and human rights. As part of exploring multiethnic and multicultural narratives, students will develop an understanding of concepts such as identity, place, and memory making. Using course materials, multimedia approaches and digital tools, students will work together to construct their own narratives of self and community.

Combines: CCS 201ENGL 110
Meets: TR9:30 AM - 10:45 AM
Collaborative Teaching & Learn 300
TR11:00 AM - 12:15 PM
Mitchell Hall 108
CRN: 4754950469
Music, Media & Spoken Word in Politics

From the rhythmic influences of hip hop and Latin-based music to the word flow raps of urban slam poets, this FLC explores how issues of race, class, gender and sexuality have shaped historic and contemporary Latino societies and cultures. In particular, students examine how Native American, Latino, European, African and Asian descent peoples have shaped the development of Mexican American communities in the United States. In addition, students will assess how narratives of agency, adaptation, survival, resistance and resilience are constructed and used to make claims to cultural citizenship and human rights. As part of exploring multiethnic and multicultural narratives, students will develop an understanding of concepts such as identity, place, and memory making. Using course materials, multimedia approaches and digital tools, students will work together to construct their own narratives of self and community.

Combines: CCS 201AMST 185
Meets: TR9:30 AM - 10:45 AM
Collaborative Teaching & Learn 300
TR11:00 AM - 12:15 PM
Mitchell Hall 106
CRN: 4755158120
Music, Media & Spoken Word in Politics

From the rhythmic influences of hip hop and Latin-based music to the word flow raps of urban slam poets, this FLC explores how issues of race, class, gender and sexuality have shaped historic and contemporary Latino societies and cultures. In particular, students examine how Native American, Latino, European, African and Asian descent peoples have shaped the development of Mexican American communities in the United States. In addition, students will assess how narratives of agency, adaptation, survival, resistance and resilience are constructed and used to make claims to cultural citizenship and human rights. As part of exploring multiethnic and multicultural narratives, students will develop an understanding of concepts such as identity, place, and memory making. Using course materials, multimedia approaches and digital tools, students will work together to construct their own narratives of self and community.

Combines: CCS 201ENGL 120
Meets: TR9:30 AM - 10:45 AM
Collaborative Teaching & Learn 300
TR11:00 AM - 12:15 PM
Mitchell Hall 213
CRN: 4755250556
Our American Law: From Juror to Justice

“WHEN in the Course of human Events, it becomes necessary for one People...” “We the People...” –  the ethos of our rule of law.  We will examine our American legal system to gain understanding of its various functions and methods, that of judges, lawyers, and the critical roles WE serve.  Toward these ends, we will review our nation’s charters and their history, study selected controversies in context, and work with developing knowledge on current dilemmas.  How do we employ the law to resolve private or public controversies?  How do juries? How do Supreme Court Justices?  What is “thinking like a lawyer?”  How does the law sustain us? In the seminar, we’ll employ readings, writings, argument and analysis, discussion, reflection, and more, all woven together with skills and knowledge developing in the linked English 120 course, toward an informed appreciation of the law and citizenship.

Combines: ARSC 198ENGL 120
Meets: TR9:30 AM - 10:45 AM
Mitchell Hall 213
TR11:00 AM - 12:15 PM
Mitchell Hall 119
CRN: 3384857659
Philosophy & Human Nature

Proceeding historically through a few of the great works of Western philosophy, this course will introduce you to some deep and enduring philosophical questions, including:  What are the ultimate foundations of reality?  What is being?  What is love?  What does it mean to be human?  How should I live?  Can knowledge make me happy?  What is the good life?  What is the good death?  What is the relationship between being and time?  What is justice?  Which political arrangement is best?  What is enlightenment?  What effects are science and technology having on our world?  How should we understand the problem of nihilism or meaninglessness?  What does it mean to think?  What do autonomy, integrity, and authenticity mean and require?  What is freedom?  What are the necessary preconditions and consequences of freedom?  What is the meaning of life?  How have the answers to that question changed over the course of Western history?  What does it mean to read well, and how is that question connected to the good life?  The interconnected goals of the course include introducing you to the Western philosophical tradition, initiating you into the art of close philosophical reading, developing your skills in critical writing and argumentation, and, in all these ways, encouraging your thoughtful engagement with the world. 

Combines: PHIL 101PHIL 156
Meets: TR11:00 AM - 12:15 PM
Mitchell Hall 101
TR12:30 PM - 1:45 PM
Mitchell Hall 118
CRN: 4931711999
Business Pitch Contest

Being your own boss may be the hardest yet most fulfilling thing you will do professionally.  So, what do the world’s most successful entrepreneurs all have in common?  They all share the same personal characteristics that define the true “Entrepreneurial Mindset.”  This mindset will make you successful both academically and professionally, whether or not you ever start your own business.  Spend the first half of the semester learning how to adopt the Entrepreneurial Mindset and fine tuning your presentation skills.  Then, work with and compete against your peers to develop a business idea that you will pitch to local business leaders. Will you be the next FLC Business Pitch Contest winner?

Combines: LAIS 150CJ 130
Meets: TR2:00 PM - 3:15 PM
Mitchell Hall 215
TR3:30 PM - 4:45 PM
Communication & Journalism 121
CRN: 6042951237

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